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Wine Buzz: January 2013 Edition

Posted on  | January 2, 2013   Bookmark and Share
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INDABA: ALL DRESSED UP FOR THE NEW YEAR

Like an old friend who suddenly knocks on your door and looks like a million bucks, the 2012 vintages of Indaba are set to hit the U.S. sporting a new look. The makeover was inspired by the idea that South Africa is an especially “green” wine region, as well as home to the most diverse plant kingdom in the world. One other new twist: Indaba is now making a Bordeaux-style red blend, Mosaic, in place of Shiraz. All wines in the range carry the SWSA seal of sustainability and SRP of $11.99.

capeclassics.com

CREATIVE BLENDING TAKING OFF IN ITALY

The trend of offbeat red blends continues apace, as seen in two new Italian offerings, each with a message that goes beyond “kitchen sink.” Tenute Piccini—based in Tuscany since 1882 and imported by Aveníu Brands—has released Memðro. This multi-region, multi-vintage blend melds Primitivo from Puglia, Montepulciano from Abruzzo, Nero d’Avola from Sicily and Merlot from Veneto. Modern and generous yet distinctly Italian, it has a bright fruity core and long finish; the name, Memoro, is Latin for “remember.” SRP $9.99

aveniubrands.com

Tuscan winery Carpineto is ruffling some feathers with Spolverino, a velvety, full-bodied Toscana IGT blend of 80% Sangiovese and 20% Canaiolo grapes. Spolverino is bottled with the top-of-the-line Stelvin Lux+ screwcap—an enclosure that is prohibited under DOCG regulations. But centuries of tradition couldn’t stop Carpineto from offering this innovative convenience. Literally translating to “feather duster,” Spolverino features a front label with a playful rooster dusting away “oldfashioned” corks. Imported by Opici Wines. SRP $15.99

opiciwines.com

 

IT’S SWEET, FIZZY, FRENCH…AND NOT EVEN NEW

Moscato is now practically a household name. Muscat is the same grape, of course, albeit less frequently seen on labels. All the more reason to share news of this French version—Jaillance Clairette de Die. The wine is gently effervescent, fruity, refreshing, off-dry and low in alcohol (7%)—though not exactly new. Jaillance has been making Clairette de Die since the 1950s, using the the Muscat Blanc à Petit Grains variety and the méthode ancestrale, wherein a natural fermentation begins in temperature-controlled steel tanks and the wine is bottled while fermentation is still occurring, capturing the bubbles. Most Americans would not even recognize Die as a region of southern France. In 1950 Henri Bonner inspired 266 of his neighbors and fellow growers to join together as a cooperative. Now imported by Baron François, the Jaillance brand was created in 2001, allowing the cooperative to offer different AOC sparkling wines under one brand name. Jaillance “Cuvée de l’Abbaye” Crémant de Bordeaux, made from 60% Semillon and 40% Cabernet Franc, for example, is a 12% ABV Brut. Both bubblies retail for $15.99; currently in NY, NJ, WA, OR, MD, DE, DC and WI.

jaillance.com

 

WINE AERATION GOES ADJUSTABLE

While sacrilege to wine purists, aeration devices—which basically accelerate the air contact a wine receives when being poured—have found a following among consumers. The latest on the scene, the patent-pending Twist, made by Seattle-based Host Studios, differs in that it uses six different settings to control the rate of aeration (settings correspond to the equivalent number of hours of “breathing”). Mature reds would call for a lower setting; tough young ones can use more. Packaged for resale; no minimum order.

SRP $40

truefabrications.com


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