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Wine Buzz: February 2014

Posted on  | February 3, 2014   Bookmark and Share
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NEW NICOLAS FEUILLATTE ROSÉ IS THE NEW LIFE OF ANY PARTY

Nicolas Feuillatte’s newest Champagne—cleverly dubbed D’Luscious—is a demi-sec rosé made with Champagne’s three primary grapes, Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay, and aged for three years. It is full-bodied for a rosé with notes of dark summer fruits and a velvety finish, pairing well with a variety of spicy, bold cuisines—Asian, Indian, South American, even soul food. Designed to stand out on a shelf or table, the new sparkler features brown-tinted glass and shimmery pink label. D’Luscious is available nationally at SRP $59 (a relatively modest price as rosé Champagne goes) through exclusive national importer Ste. Michelle Wine Estates.

smwe.com

HOT PINK: LAS ROCAS ROSÉ SETS THE TABLE FOR ROMANCE

The visual side of wine can get lost amid chatter of aroma, palate, body, structure, etc., leading us sometimes to forget how stunning a vibrant rosé can be. Las Rocas, based in Spain’s Aragaon region, has a way with Garnacha. Vinified as a red, it makes a dark, deep wine; and as rosé, its bright hue could practically stop traffic—ideal for Valentine’s Day displays or case stacks. Las Rocas rosé is dry and fruit-driven (raspberry, strawberry) with a hint of spice.

SRP $15

lasrocaswine.com

 

IBERIAN SANGRIA TAKES AN OFFICIAL STEP

There’s sangria, and now there’s Sangria. The European Parliament passed legislation in January establishing that true sangria comes from Spain or Portugal. Moving forward, if packaged versions of this popular mix of wine, brandy, sugar, juice, etc. come from other nations, they will have to clearly state their origin, as in German Sangria. So now the fruity summer quencher commands the same degree of geographic origin as Champagne. However, based on similar international protection bestowed on Port, it is likely that few Americans will much care (if they even notice).

 

DIAGEO BRINKS GAVILAN BACK TO MARKET

Chalone Vineyard—one of the best-known wineries in California’s Central Coast, not to mention one that shares the name of its AVA—is located in the Gavilan Mountain Range, along the eastern border of Monterey County. More than a decade ago, the winery produced a second label, Gavilan, and now Diageo, which acquired Chalone in 2004, is bringing the brand back. Targeting both on- and off-premise markets, the first Gavilan wines being released are a 2012 Chardonnay (SRP $19.99) and 2012 Pinot Noir ($24), both bearing the Chalone appellation.

chalonevineyard.com


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