A | A | A

Everybody Loves Rosé Champagne

Posted on  | November 18, 2015   Bookmark and Share
Written by |

With pink wine now soaring, rosé Champagne is gaining an edge on its peers.

It is now old news that rosé Champagnes (and rosé wines in general) are more popular than ever. The trend began around the turn of the century, and sales have been growing steadily since. My local retailer told me that 47% of the wines he sold this summer were rosés.

The reason? We have gotten over the “sweet” curse of white Zinfandel, and blush wines in general (these wines still sell, of course, to those people who prefer sweeter wines). One popular theory is that people started to realize that most rosé wines—particularly Champagnes—are not sweet, but dry, and not frivolous.

Going back a while, I can remember the time that a “real man” wouldn’t drink pink anything, especially Champagne; the myth was that “rosés are for ladies.” I never believed that trash, thank goodness, and have been enjoying rosé Champagnes for decades. I must admit, though, just from my own observation, that rosé Champagnes tend to be even more popular with women than with men.


A mere 15 years ago, rosé Champagne sales represented 2% to 3% of all Champagne sales. That figure has multiplied five-fold, with more than 10% of all Champagne sales now being rosé. And it seems to be increasing—despite the fact that rosé Champagnes are always more expensive than white Champagnes, at least $10 more, and often a lot more than that.

The price of fame can sometimes be costly. Or profitable, depending on how you view it. Let’s look at two Champagne houses that always championed rosé Champagnes, even before they were “in,” Laurent-Perrier and Billecart-Salmon. Pre-2000, Laurent-Perrier’s Cuvée Rosé Brut was the largest-selling rosé Champagne in the world; it retailed last century for about $35, sometimes less on sale. Laurent-Perrier’s style emphasizes fruitiness. When rosé Champagnes became hot, Laurent-Perrier for a while could not make enough; Rosé Brut became difficult to find. Nowadays, Laurent-Perrier Cuvée Rosé Brut retails for about $78 a bottle; its white non-vintage brut’s average price is $41, making that a $37 premium for the rosé! (Laurent-Perrier is no longer the largest-selling brut rosé; that honor goes to the largest Champagne house, Moët & Chandon, whose NV Rosé Imperial averages $58 retail).

Billecart-Salmon was the darling of so many rosé Champagne lovers, so much so that at one time an astounding 40% of this house’s Champagne sales were rosés (they normally produce at least 20% of their Champagnes as rosés, a very large amount compared to other houses). Its followers (including me, at that time) loved the light, delicate style of this salmon-colored rosé. It retailed for about $40 before 2000. Today, Billecart-Salmon’s NV Rosé’s average retail price is $87 (Billecart-Salmon’s NV Brut averages $57).

You might say that both Laurent-Perrier and Billecart-Salmon cashed in on the popularity of their rosés, big time, but they are the exceptions rather than the rule. For example, Moët’s white NV Brut Imperial averages $49; the NV rosé is just $9 more.

Surprising Value

Rosé Champagnes are more expensive than standard bruts not just because they are so popular. They always were slightly more expensive; it’s a costlier process making rosés compared to standard bruts. (The pink color of rosé Champagne typically comes from the addition of still Pinot Noir red wine, as opposed to red-grape skin contact; blind tastings have demonstrated the differences in taste between the two methods are negligible.)

Are they worth the extra money? My answer is a resounding “Yes.” Not only are rosé Champagnes delicious and really pretty to look at, but they also generally accompany food very well—better than most other Champagnes.

It’s no surprise to hear that the very best rosé Champagnes are quite expensive. But there are so many good rosé Champagnes being imported into the U.S now at multiple price levels—and the non-vintage examples recommended in the sidebar all fit into the $45-$80 SRP range, hardly a dealbreaker for consumers who have their sights set on the best of the best. (If you are looking for a sparkling rosé under $40, forget about Champagne. But Roederer Estate makes a really fine Brut Rosé in Mendocino County for under $30 SRP.)

Like other Champagnes, rosé Champagnes are made in different styles: they range from elegant and light, such as Billecart-Salmon and Perrier-Jouët Cuvée Belle Epoque, to full-bodied and powerful, such as Bollinger and Krug. My personal preferences lean toward light, subtle, floral and elegant. For example, I did not list Piper-Heidsieck’s Rosé NV Sauvage, which is intensely fruity; some people love it, but it’s not for me.

Note that there are far more NV rosés listed than vintage rosés; many Champagne houses do not bother to make vintage rosés because NV rosés are easier to produce.

There are still more fine rosé Champagnes out there, albeit often in small supply. Charles Heidsieck’s Brut Rosé 1999, for example, is over $100 and might be difficult to find at this point. If you can find it, you will love the 1999, but Charles Heidsieck’s 2006 Brut Rosé is readily available and excellent. Charles Heidsieck’s Rosé Reserve NV is a delight as well, a bit lighter and more floral than the typical robust style of Charles Heidsieck. Champagne Louis Roederer’s 2008 Rosé is one of the best Champagnes I have enjoyed in the past few years; lighter-styled than usual, it is an utterly delicious rosé.

Prestige cuvées, by definition, are the best Champagnes a producer makes. Most Prestige cuvées are made in small quantities, especially rosés. For example, only 5% of the already small production of Cristal is its rosé. Prestige Cuvée rosés are expensive; some are over $300 retail; the Cristal Rosé retails for $500 plus.

Are they worth the price? For me, three of the ones I list in the sidebar are worth the price in terms of quality: Cristal, Krug and Dom Pérignon. But frankly, since Cristal white is half the price of the rosé, I would choose it over Cristal Rosé. And for the price differential, again about half the price, I would choose DP white over DP Rosé. Krug is a different story….




Recommended Rosé Champagnes

Listed alphabetically, with top favorites in bold face




Bollinger Rosé

Delamotte Brut Rosé

Deutz Brut Rosé

Drappier Brut Rosé

Drappier Brut Rosé Nature (Zero Dosage)

Duval-Leroy Rosé Prestige

Fleury Brut Rosé

Gosset Grand Rosé Brut

Alfred Gratien Brut Rosé Classique

Charles Heidsieck Brut Rosé Reserve

Henriot Brut Rosé

Lanson Brut Rosé

Lanson Extra Age Brut Rosé

Moët & Chandon Brut Rosé Imperial

G.H. Mumm Brut Rosé

Bruno Paillard Brut Rosé

Première Cuvée

Pascal Doquet Brut Rosé Premiers Crus

Perrier-Jouët Blason de France Brut Rosé

Philipponnat Brut Reserve Rosé

Ruinart Brut Rosé

Veuve Clicquot Brut Rosé


Bollinger La Grande Année Rosé 2004

Deutz Brut Rosé Millesimé 2009

Charles Heidsieck Brut Rosé 2006

Pol Roger Brut Rosé 2006 or 2004

Louis Roederer Brut Rosé 2008

Veuve Clicquot Brut Rosé 2004

Prestige Cuvée

Gosset Célébris Rosé Extra Brut 2007

Alfred Gratien Cuvée Paradis Rosé NV

Krug Rosé NV

(Moët & Chandon) Cuvée Dom Pérignon Rosé 2002

Perrier-Jouét Cuvée Belle Epoque Rosé 2004

Louis Roederer Cristal Rosé 2004 or 2006

Ruinart, Dom Ruinart Rosé 2002

Taittinger Comtes de Champagne  Rosé 2004 or 2005

Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame Rosé 2004


Comments are closed.

About Us | Contact Us | Wholesaler Login | Publisher Login | Licensees Login
Copyright © 2016 Beverage Media Group ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
152 Madison Avenue, Suite 600, New York, NY 10016
Phone: 212-571-3232 | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice