54
Beverage Media
March 2013
AT
THE
BAR
Bar Resolutions 2013
More Profit and a Higher Quality of Life
BY ROBERT PLOTKIN
Avoid Stagnancy
There’s no room at the top for the com-
placent and uninspired. It’s all about
stepping over the rut, not falling into it.
So shake things up. Even subtle changes
can make a difference in the feel of the
place. Guests will appreciate the scen-
ery change, as will the staff. Along the
same lines, how about changing your
staff’s uniforms? Wearing the same work
clothes gets old and takes a toll on staff
morale. Put the bounce back in their
step with some new duds.
Pricing Review
Who doesn’t want to think they are get-
ting the most for their hard-earned mon-
ey? Considering the nature of the econo-
my and our sensitivity to prices, offering
your clientele drinks with high-perceived
value is becoming an increasingly impor-
tant success factor. Value from a guest’s
perspective means something is worth
the price paid. Marketing impeccable
cocktails at reasonable prices provides
guests ample reasons to return another
night. A loyal clientele is an effective
hedge against a down economy.
Reduce Your
Carbon Footprint
Global warming is something weighing
on our collective mind. Today a compa-
ny that doesn’t make a good faith effort
to clean up their act and reduce their
carbon footprint offends our collective
sensibility. The upshot is that turning
green is good for business. Not only will
it lower operating costs, but it clearly
demonstrates to staff and clientele that
you’re driven by more than just prof-
its. Food and beverage
operations are prime for
this type of effort. One
estimate puts the amount
of recyclable material
per 100 pounds of restau-
rant garbage at roughly
70%. Reclaiming as much
of that material as feasible
is responsible business and
ecologically significant.
Slow Down
A bartender’s degree of professional-
ism is most apparent when the bar is
slammed. While there is a natural ten-
dency when behind the bar to rush to
keep up with rising demand, cranking
out drinks as quickly as possible isn’t
the objective. What would happen if
your bartenders broke with convention
and slowed down a few mph? The likely
result is that they’d make better drinks,
waste less product, appear more pro-
fessional and provide your guests with
hospitable service. Even when people
are standing at the bar waiting to or-
der, bartenders need only smile,
acknowledge them and say that
he’ll be with them in a few mo-
ments. So what’s the rush?
Do The Unexpected
In the final analysis, success in-
volves exceeding people’s expec-
tations and occasionally doing
the delightfully unexpected. For
example, imagine applying the
concept of random acts of kind-
ness to your business. What if you
periodically bought people in your
establishment their dinners? Or sent
a bottle of wine to a table compli-
ments of the management? Or bought
S
ometimes big ideas come in small packages, other
times they’re plastered on a billboard or tattooed on a
server’s forehead. What’s the difference how or where
you come by a good idea as long as it eventually lands
in your laptop? To that end, here are a few pointers to help
make 2013 a profitable year. Salud!
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