18
BEVERAGE MEDIA
September 2013
THE BEVERAGE NETWORK:
What
is a favorite current pairing from your
menu and list?
ELISE LOEHR:
Crispy squash blos-
soms stuffed with lamb confit and pimen-
to cheese, drizzled with a strawberry and
white balsamic reduction with 2012 Châ-
teau de Coudray Montpensier “Le Grand
Bouqueteau” Chinon Rosé.
TBN:
Do you do special wine
promotions on a regular basis?
EL:
We host occasional wine or beer
tastings for our guests, and we offer half-
price wine promotions throughout the
slower summer months.
TBN:
Do you do wine dinners?
EL:
I avoid doing them as much as pos-
sible. Dinners tend to be more expen-
sive for the consumer and laborious for
the restaurant. I find that tastings offer
the better value as well as focus of at-
tention on the wines. Tastings also pro-
vide a far greater benefit to the winery,
importer, wholesaler or producer show-
casing their wine.
TBN:
What are some wines that have
done especially well for you by the glass?
EL:
Cantine Valpane Barbera; Vinchio-
Vaglio “La Romantica” Bracchetto;
Emile Beyer Pinot Gris; Pali “Hunting-
ton” Pinot Noir; Viña von Siebenthal
Gran Reserva Carmenere.
TBN:
How many distributors do you
do business with?
EL:
Nine.
TBN:
Do you have a system/routine
for managing your wine orders?
EL:
I usually order twice a week and pre-
fer to send my orders via email or text so
that I can reference my orders at any time.
TBN:
Do you have a strategy for
displaying wines at the restaurant?
EL:
We have a sideboard table in the
center walkway of our restaurant, where
we display and hold all the wines we
serve by the glass. The servers actually
bring each bottle to the table to pour.
TBN:
What recent trends have you
noticed in wine?
EL:
Interest in wine has driven an enthu-
siastic interest in cocktails and beers.
TBN:
What tips do you find yourself
frequently telling your staff?
EL:
Listen to the guest. Find out what they
have had recently that they really enjoyed.
And most importantly, be the hero by intro-
ducing your guest to a less expensive wine
than they may have been willing to pay for—
they will be impressed and appreciative!
TBN:
What is another wine list/
program that you admire?
EL:
Spruce in San Francisco, for depth and
breadth. They also offer a really terrific selec-
tion of half bottles and wines by the glass,
cocktails, spirits, beers and ciders. A most
clever addition to their wine list: theUnder $80
section, for those customers who may not
necessarily want to navigate through pages
of Grand Cru Burgundy or cult Cabernet.
Southern Comforts
Elise Loehr, Beverage Director/Proprietor,
F. Scott’s Restaurant & Jazz Bar
and Table 3 Restaurant & Market,
Nashville, Tennessee
BY W. R. TISH
SOMM
SEZ
Cuisine:
F. Scott’s - Contemporary
American; Table 3 - Traditional Brasserie
Selections on the wine list:
F. Scott’s -
375; Table 3 - 100
Bottles in inventory:
2,500
Price range of list:
F. Scott’s - $25-$675;
Table 3 - $20-$150
Sweet spot on list:
$75
Wine list strengths:
Diversity—regionally,
varietally and stylistically
Wines by the glass:
35 (11 White, 10
Red, 2 Rosé, 7 Sparkling, 5 Apéritif);
changes every 2-3 weeks
Price range by the glass:
F. Scott’s - $5-
$25; Table 3 - $5-$15
Stemware:
Riedel, Stoelzle-Oberglas,
Spiegelau
Preservation system:
Refrigeration
and argon gas
CORKBOARD
FSCOTT.COM / TABLE3NASHVILLE.COM
F.
Scott’s, in Nashville’s bustling Green Hills neighborhood, has earned
a reputation for delivering quality on many levels: farm-to-table food,
elegant atmosphere, friendly service, creative cocktails, well-chosen
wines and—apropos of Music City—great jazz. Having established F. Scott’s
as a destination, Beverage Director Elise Loehr and Co-Proprietor Wendy
Burch opened a second, more casual brasserie, Table 3.
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